Tips on how to enjoy sushi at a restaurant
On this page, we introduce you on how you can enjoy sushi at a restaurant.

How to eat sushi

How to order

Interpretation of sushi terminology/tips

How to eat sushi

Eat with chopsticks

1. Pour soy sauce into a small soy sauce dish.
2. Lightly turn one piece of the sushi sideways then pick up the entire piece by ensuring that the rice and sushi topping stay together.
3. Touch the tip of the sushi topping to the soy sauce making sure you don’t put any soy sauce on rice. Then directly bring the sushi
to your mouth.

Eat with hand

1. Pour soy sauce into a small soy sauce dish.
2. Slightly tilt a piece of sushi with your hand. Bring your index finger and middle finger together on the rice side of the sushi and your
thumb on the topping side. Hold the sushi by slightly pinching it from both sides.
3. Touch a little bit of soy sauce to the sushi topping and directly bring it to your mouth.

Sample video on how to eat sushi

How to order

◎ When you want to drink green tea.
ocha o onegai shimasu.
(I’ll have hot green tea.)

◎ When you want to see a menu.
Menu o misete kudasai.
(Please let me take a look at the menu.)

◎ When you want the chef to decide your selection.
Omakase de onegaishimasu.
(I’ll have Omakase.)

◎ When you want to inform the restaurant of restrictions.
Watashi wa ○○ ga taberaremasen.
(I can’t eat ○○.)

◎ When you want to order without wasabi, Japanese horseradish.
Wasabi wa nuite kudasai.
(Please don’t put wasabi into the sushi.)

◎ When you want to ask today’s special.
Kyouno osusume wa nani desuka?
(What in today’s recommendation?)

◎ When you want to ask for your bill.
Okanjo o onegai shimasu.
(May I have the check please?)

◎ When you leave a restaurant after payment.
Gochisou sama deshita.
(Thank you foa a lovely meal.)

Interpretation of sushi terminology/tips

◎ Okonomi
It means “to order whatever you like”. Also, “okimari” is to order a set menu, and “omakase” is to leave your order to the sushi chef and his recommendations. For first-timers, we recommend you start with “okonomi”.

◎ Shyun
It means that the ingredients are in season and are at their peak of flavor. By ordering “shyun toppings” you can experience tastier sushi.

◎ Shiromi
A term used for fish with white meat such as sea bream. Shiromi is a firm meat.

◎ Akami
A term used for fish with red meat such as tuna. Akami is a particularly popular topping.

◎ Hikarimono
A term used for fish with a shiny bluish-white skin such as mackerel or horse mackerel. They are usually firmed up marinating in a mixture of salt and vinegar.

◎ Wasabi
A spicy root vegetable served as a condiment with various dishes in Japan such as sashimi and sushi. Its major characteristics are its aroma which stimulates the nasal passages and its heat level.
This is a type of flavor you either like or don’t like. For those who don’t care for it, you may order your sushi “sabinuki” (without wasabi).

◎ Gari
Sliced pickled ginger marinated in sugared vinegar. A crunchy texture is its unique feature.
If eaten after each piece of sushi, it helps to cleanse the palate so that you can better enjoy the taste of the following piece.

[ History of sushi ]

A Chinese character for “sushi”, meaning prepared fish dish, first appears in the oldest Asian dictionary
during the Qin dynasty around 300 – 400 B.C.
Japanese sushi origin is considered “funazushi” in Omi, Shiga prefecture.
Around the beginning of the 19th century, the period when Tokyo was called “Edo”, the food service industry centered on food stands lined up side by side in the city of Edo.
This is where “Nigirizushi” (hand-formed sushi) made its first appearances. It is also called “Edomaezushi” because of “Edomae” (Edo style, literally meaning in front of Edo), in other words the use of sea food and seaweeds from Tokyo Bay.

Since then, due to some refinements by Yohei Hanaya, a sushi chef and shop owner, the great taste and quickness of sushi gained popularity all over Edo.
Then because of the Great Kanto Earthquake in 1923, sushi chefs who were victims of the disaster returned to their hometowns, and this is how the “sushi” culture spread widely throughout Japan.

[ Recommended sightseeing spots around Tsukiji ]

- Tsukiji Hongwanji -

築地本願寺Tsukiji Hongwanji is Tokyo branch temple of Nishi Hongwanji (or Hongwanji) in Kyoto. It was built in Higashi Nihonbashi in 1617 but moved to Tsukiji due to the Great Fire of Meireki.
At the time of the move, this land was reclaimed and thus named Tsukiji
(meaning building up the ground/earth)

- Kabukiza -

築地本願寺Tsukiji Hongwanji is Tokyo branch temple of Nishi Hongwanji (or Hongwanji) in Kyoto. It was built in Higashi Nihonbashi in 1617 but moved to Tsukiji due to the Great Fire of Meireki.
At the time of the move, this land was reclaimed and thus named Tsukiji
(meaning building up the ground/earth)

PAGETOP